Track Our Turtles

Mayor Mort – Sub Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)


Mayor Mort was found at the St. Lucie Power Plant on August 6, 2016. The turtle was chronic debilitated (underweight and lethargic) so it was transferred to LMC’s sea turtle hospital. The turtle had numerous large barnacles on its carapace and hundreds of small barnacles and marine leeches on the skin. The turtle also had an old, healed boat strike wound on the carapace. The turtle was put in freshwater for the first few days to remove the external parasites. While at LMC’s hospital, the turtle received fluids, antibiotics, and iron injections.

Approximately six months after arriving at LMC’s hospital the turtle was cleared by our veterinarian with a clean bill of health. On February 13, 2017, Mayor Mort was outfitted with a Wildlife Computer’s satellite transmitter. This transmitter will allow LMC biologists to track the turtle’s movement post-release to ensure that the turtle is behaving normally after rehabilitation. Mayor Mort was released from Juno Beach, FL on February 14, 2017. Follow this turtle’s journey by clicking on Mayor Mort’s photo.

Mayor Mort was lovingly named in memory of Juno Beach’s late Mayor, Mayor Mort Levine who served the town from 2008 until his passing in March 2016. Mayor Levine was extremely proud of the sea turtle hospital at LMC.

 

Betty White – Sub Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)


Betty White was found floating in the Loxahatchee River on December 22, 2015. She was carrying a large amount of epibiota, was chronic debilitated, lethargic, and underweight. Although Betty White was classified as a sub-adult turtle based on her size (87.5cm carapace length), LMC’s vet was able to perform an ultrasound that determined Betty White to be a female turtle. Betty White received injections of vitamins, iron, and antibiotics. LMC’s vet was able to remove 2.5 liters of air from Betty White’s coelomic cavity which allowed the turtle to submerge normally.

Betty White was named after the actress – a lover of all animals.

 

Auntie Roe – Sub Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)


Auntie Roe was found at the St. Lucie Power Plant on October 15, 2015. The turtle was chronic debilitated (underweight and lethargic) so it was transferred to LMC’s sea turtle hospital. Auntie Roe also had an old, healed shark bite wound on the right side of the carapace and part of the right rear flipper was missing.

During Auntie Roe’s stay at LMC’s hospital, the turtle received antibiotics. Over time the turtle’s condition improved; Auntie Roe began eating well and put on weight. On April 29, 2016, Auntie Roe was outfitted with a Wildlife Computer’s satellite transmitter. This transmitter will allow LMC biologists to track the turtle’s movement post-release to ensure that the turtle is behaving normally after rehabilitation. Auntie Roe was released from Juno Beach, FL on May 5, 2016. Follow this turtle’s journey by clicking on Auntie Roe’s photo.

 

Bowden – Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)

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Bowden is an adult male loggerhead turtle that stranded at the St. Lucie Power Plant Intake Canal on April 10, 2015. Inwater Research Group biologists noted that the turtle was lethargic, underweight, and had many large barnacles on its carapace so they called Loggerhead Marinelife Center so that the turtle could receive the medical attention it needed. Bowden was administered fluids, antibiotics, and injections as prescribed by LMC’s vet. Bowden was declared healthy and released from Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach, Florida on August 26, 2015.

Not much is known about adult male sea turtles since they spend their entire lives at sea. Unless they are sick and strand (wash up on shore) biologists have little opportunity to study them. Therefore, it is important for us to collect as much data as we can from Bowden’s journey. Bowden was outfitted with a GPS satellite tag before release so his location could be tracked. Bowden’s location is being tracked by GPS satellite tag.

 

Amanda – Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)

Amanda
Amanda is an adult loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) that was rescued by a group of divers about a mile offshore from the Lake Worth Inlet on December 28, 2014. Amanda suffered from mechanical trauma to both front flippers. The wounds were debrided each week, cleaned with betadine, and treated with cold laser therapy routinely. By April, Amanda’s wounds had healed well and cold laser therapy was no longer necessary. The turtle did develop anemia so iron injections were started. Amanda responded well to the iron injections and was medically cleared for release by LMC’s vet.

Amanda was successfully released off of Juno Beach on June 11, 2015. Amanda’s location is being tracked by GPS satellite tag. Photo by Thomas Dickinson.

 

Olaf – Juvenile Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)

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Olaf is a juvenile loggerhead that was rescued at the St. Lucie Power Plant intake canal on November 11, 2014. Olaf had two deep prop wounds on the right marginal scutes above the right front flipper. Otherwise, Olaf seemed to be in good shape and was eating well. Cold laser therapy was used to help heal the wounds on the carapace and antibiotics were administered.

Olaf was cleared for release and outfitted with a SPOT5 satellite transmitter before being released on April 22, 2015 (Earth Day) from Juno Beach. Olaf’s location is being tracked by the satellite tag.

 

Elsa – Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)

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Elsa
is an adult loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) that was hooked by a fisherman at the Juno Beach Pier on October 13, 2014. Elsa is one of the first success stories of Loggerhead Marinelife Center’s newly launched Responsible Pier Initiative. Arriving underweight and with a heavy barnacle load, the bloodwork revealed that Elsa was anemic and hypoglucemic. Radiographs showed that Elsa also had two fishing hooks, one in the mouth and the other father past the esophagus. The hook from Elsa‘s mouth was successfully removed by LMC’s veterinarian and the second hook passed with no issues.

Elsa was placed in freshwater for the first few days to remove any external parasites and was started on Parenteral Nutrition. After receiving antibiotics, fluids, and iron injections, Elsa gained weight and showed normal bloodwork. Elsa was successfully released off of Juno Beach on March 21, 2015. Elsa‘s location is being tracked by GPS satellite tag.

 

Captain Jack – Sub-adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)


Captain Jack is a sub-adult Loggerhead that was found in the St. Lucie FPL Power Plant intake canal. The turtle arrived with a heavy barnacle load on its carapace. Bloodwork showed the turtle was anemic, mildly hypoglycemic and hypocalcemic. Radiographs revealed a moderate amount of shell material throughout the GI tract. The turtle spent the first couple of days in fresh water to eliminate any of the salt water parasites that were found upon arrival. Captain Jack received fluids, antibiotics, and iron injections as prescribed during its stay at LMC. Captain Jack was successfully released off Juno Beach on January 22, 2014. Captain Jack’s location is being tracked by GPS satellite tag.

 

JP – Sub-adult Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)

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JP arrived at our facility late in the evening on Friday, September 21, 2012. The turtle was accidentally hooked by a fisherman at the Juno Beach Pier who then notified FWC when they realized it was a turtle on their line. Radiographs revealed the turtle had ingested 4 hooks; 2 in the oral cavity, 1 in the stomach, and another farther along in the intestinal tract. Surgery was performed to remove the 2 in the mouth and the one in the stomach. We are monitoring the turtle’s feces in hopes that the last hook will pass on its own. The turtle also has an old healed injury to the right front flipper which resulted in the loss of 2/3 of the flipper. JP’s location is being tracked by GPS satellite tag.

 

Donovan – Juvenile Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)


Donovan is a juvenile Loggerhead sea turtle that stranded in the Cape Cod area cold-stunned. The turtle was suffering from hypothermia and was transferred to LMC to receive long-term treatment as facilities in the New England area were over-capacity with other cold-stunned sea turtles. Donovan will receive antibiotics and anti-fungal medication to help support the turtle’s suppressed immune system and a nutritious diet until healthy enough to be released. Donovan’s location is being tracked by GPS satellite tag.

 

Kahuna – Adult Female Loggerhead (Click photo for updates)

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Kahuna is an adult female loggerhead that appeared to have been attacked by a shark. Approximately 60% of the left front flipper was missing and there were several deep lacerations on the right front flipper that needed to be surgically repaired. The turtle also had labored breathing possibly from aspirating sea water. This was treated with daily nebulizations. Kahuna also received antibiotics, vitamins and good nutritional support. Kahuna’s location and other data are being tracked by GPS satellite tag.

 

Radley – Sub-Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for final update)

Radley is a loggerhead sea turtle that was found with a scrape on the right side of the skull and an old necrotic patch of skin on the neck. The turtle was slightly underweight and anemic and had a moderate amount of barnacles and algae on the carapace. The wounds were treated topically and Radley received antibiotics and vitamin and nutritional therapy. Radley’s location is being tracked by GPS satellite tag.

 

 

Gilda – Adult Female Loggerhead (Click photo for final update)

Track_gilda
Gilda is an adult loggerhead female that stranded in the intake wells of the Port Everglades power plant October 8th 2008. Her injuries were consistent with motor-craft injury, with both sharp and blunt trauma to both front flippers. She had lost huge amounts of blood and was completely unable to swim; just floating at the mercy of the current. After multiple surgeries and close to 2 years of rehabilitation, gilda’s success story continues with her triumphant release back to her ocean home. Gilda’s progress and location are being tracked by satellite tag.

 

Morgan – Sub-Adult Loggerhead (Click photo for final update)

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Morgan was admitted to LMC with a motorcraft injury to the Caudal Carapace (tail end of the carapace). There were two full thickness fractures running parallel to the spine. We estimate that Morgan was hit by a boat. Radiographs and bloodwork were done upon admission and a treatment plan was developed. Morgan’s injuries were more serious than most turtles we see, and thus required a longer and more extensive rehabilitation program. Morgan was with LMC just over a year and upon successful completion of rehabilitation was outfitted with a satellite tag that will track location from time to time.