Skerry

Skerry

Species: Loggerhead Sea Turtle
(Caretta caretta)

Arrival Date
: September 25, 2017
Stranding Location: St. Lucie, Florida

Initial Weight
: 77.16 lbs.
Current Weight: 108.28 lbs.

Issue: Chronic Debilitation
Current Condition: Improving

Skerry is named in honor of Brian Skerry, a leading National Geographic photojournalist specializing in marine wildlife and underwater environments and LMC’s 9th annual Go Blue Awards Luncheon speaker.

ADMISSION NOTE:

Skerry is a sub-adult loggerhead that was found in the St. Lucie Power Plant Intake Canal. The initial blood-work showed anemia and slight hypoglycemia. There are old boat propeller wounds that are healing on the carapace, neck and near the tail. Hospital staff administered fluids, antibiotics and iron. Initial radiographs did not show anything of concern internally. The turtle was put into freshwater to remove the barnacles, leeches and other epibiota that covered the turtle’s body. We will continue to monitor blood-work closely as we treat Skerry.

PROGRESS KEY:

Sea_turtle_icon(green) This turtle is progressing well and responding to therapy as desired.

Sea_turtle_icon(yellow)There is a minor issue that we are working to resolve.

Sea_turtle_icon(red)More details to follow.

PROGRESS NOTES:

07/11/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)Skerry has been cleared for release 7/12

07/04/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

06/27/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry is doing well off antibiotics. The turtle will be evaluated next week for possible release.

06/20/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry has now been taken off all medications.

06/13/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry was tagged this week in preparation for eventual release.

06/07/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

05/30/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry continues to heal well.

05/24/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Skerry’s new treatment is working so well that we are going to try the same thing with Le Fou, who has a similar issue.

05/16/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Bacterial cultured revealed a very drug-resistant bacteria involved, so treatment has been changed to get that organism.

05/10/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Biopsy and cultures were taken. We should have results within 1-2 weeks.

05/02/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) We are in the process of scheduling a biopsy for Skerry.

04/26/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) A cloacoscopy procedure was performed to examine the healing taking place in the cloaca. The area is slowly improving, but is not totally healing. We may do a biopsy in the next couple of weeks.

04/20/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow)Cloacal lesion is slowly healing.

04/11/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) There is no change.

04/06/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Skerry is improving somewhat with the new treatment.

03/29/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Because of a persistent white count elevation, Skerry’s treatment has been modified.

03/22/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Skerry is continuing treatment.

03/14/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Skerry’s white cell count has risen substantially. A new antibiotic has been added to the treatment regimen.

03/09/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Skerry had a colonoscopy on Tuesday. It revealed that the cloacal abscess extends about 15 cm forward, but it is apparent that healing is taking place.

03/01/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Skerry’s white cell count remains somewhat elevated

02/23/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Treatment of the abscess is going as planned.

02/14/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) A cloacal abscess was discovered today. The turtle has been started on appropriate treatment.

02/07/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

01/31/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry’s white cell count has dropped dramatically in the last two weeks and is approaching normal.

01/25/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Turtle’s white cell count has now leveled off.

01/17/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Due to an increasing white cell count, the treatment plan has been modified.

01/10/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

01/03/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

12/27/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry is continuing to respond well to treatment.

12/20/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

12/13/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

12/07/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

11/29/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry continues to receive medication for infection and anemia. The bone marrow seems to be responding well to treatment.

11/22/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

11/15/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

11/08/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry has been moved to a larger tank with more room to dive.

11/01/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

10/25/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Skerry is responding well to treatment. The anemia is already beginning to resolve.

10/19/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

10/04/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)Skerry has been eating and is responding well to the treatment plan.

9/25/17 – Skerry is a sub-adult loggerhead that was found in the St. Lucie Power Plant Intake Canal. The initial blood-work showed anemia and slight hypoglycemia. There are old boat propeller wounds that are healing on the carapace, neck and near the tail. Hospital staff administered fluids, antibiotics and iron. Initial radiographs did not show anything of concern internally. The turtle was put into freshwater to remove the barnacles, leeches and other epibiota that covered the turtle’s body. We will continue to monitor blood-work closely as we treat Skerry.