Rosie

Rosie

Species: Loggerhead sea turtle
(Caretta caretta)

Arrival Date
: January 2, 2017
Stranding Location: Stuart, Florida

Initial Weight
: 55.8 lbs.
Current Weight: 48.1 lbs.

IssueFishing gear ingestion, buoyancy issue (intestinal)
Current Condition: Stable

ADMISSION NOTE:

Rosie is a large juvenile loggerhead that was found in the St. Lucie River by boaters. The turtle at some point ingested fishing line and is now passing it out through the cloaca. We will monitor the passing of the line closely. There is cotton ball attached to it in order for us to see its progression out of the digestive tract.  Radiographs show that the turtle does not have an ingested hook and that the intestines are impacted with food debris. There is also air in the intestines. We will monitor closely with bloodwork and follow-up radiographs as we treat with antibiotics and other medications.

PROGRESS KEY:

Sea_turtle_icon(green)This turtle is progressing well and responding to therapy as desired.

Sea_turtle_icon(yellow)There is a minor issue that we are working to resolve.

Sea_turtle_icon(red)More details to follow.

PROGRESS NOTES:

02/16/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The turtle is able to submerge occasionally but is still floating a majority of the time.

02/08/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The veterinarian did a coelomic tap and removed just over 4 liters of air. The coelomic cavity did not immediately fill with air after the tap. This means the hole in the lung is starting to heal.

01/25/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The appetite has improved, and the turtle is now primarily on oral medications.

01/12/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The turtle defecated a large quantity of crab shells and the remainder of the fishing line. New radiographs reveal free air in the coelomic cavity indicating an active hole in the lung. We will be removing air from the coelomic cavity once weekly. Usually the holes will close on their own with this treatment.

01/02/17 – Rosie is a large juvenile loggerhead that was found in the St. Lucie River by boaters. The turtle at some point ingested fishing line and is now passing it out through the cloaca. We will monitor the passing of the line closely. There is cotton ball attached to it in order for us to see its progression out of the digestive tract.  Radiographs show that the turtle does not have an ingested hook and that the intestines are impacted with food debris. There is also air in the intestines. We will monitor closely with bloodwork and follow-up radiographs as we treat with antibiotics and other medications.