Rosie

Rosie

Species: Loggerhead sea turtle
(Caretta caretta)

Arrival Date
: January 2, 2017
Stranding Location: Stuart, Florida

Initial Weight
: 55.8 lbs.
Current Weight: 87.08 lbs.

IssueFishing gear ingestion, buoyancy issue (intestinal)
Current Condition: Improving

ADMISSION NOTE:

Rosie is a large juvenile loggerhead that was found in the St. Lucie River by boaters. The turtle at some point ingested fishing line and is now passing it out through the cloaca. We will monitor the passing of the line closely. There is cotton ball attached to it in order for us to see its progression out of the digestive tract.  Radiographs show that the turtle does not have an ingested hook and that the intestines are impacted with food debris. There is also air in the intestines. We will monitor closely with bloodwork and follow-up radiographs as we treat with antibiotics and other medications.

PROGRESS KEY:

Sea_turtle_icon(green)This turtle is progressing well and responding to therapy as desired.

Sea_turtle_icon(yellow)There is a minor issue that we are working to resolve.

Sea_turtle_icon(red)More details to follow.

PROGRESS NOTES:

09/19/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

09/13/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

09/05/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

08/29/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white cell count is finally normal and the turtle has been taken off all antibiotics.

08/22/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

08/16/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

08/10/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

07/29/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie continues to slowly improve.

07/18/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

07/11/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white count came back down from the revised treatment.

07/04/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white count went very high when antibiotics were
changed, so they were changed back to original.

06/27/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie continues to undergo nebulization with antibiotics. We plan to take lung radiographs this week to evaluate the improvement.

06/20/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Bacterial cultures revealed a drug-resistant bacteria in the turtle’s lungs. The treatment has been changed to target that organism both systemically and via nebulization.

06/13/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie went under bronchoscopy to check the lungs. We took samples for bacterial culture and should have results by next week.

06/07/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

05/30/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie continues to have lung issues, so we plan to do a bronchoscopy procedure in the next week to get cultures from the lungs.

05/24/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

05/16/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

05/10/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

05/02/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

04/26/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white cell count is approaching normal.

04/20/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Radiographs revealed lungs are slowly healing.

04/11/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) White cell count is approaching normal.

04/06/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

03/29/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie continues to do well.

03/22/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

03/14/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

03/09/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) The white cell count has decreased and the current treatment plan will be continued.

03/01/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white cell count has increased and a new antibiotic has been started.

02/23/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) The bacterial culture came back negative. The fungal culture results are still pending.

02/14/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie had a bronchoscopy yesterday to investigate a possible lung infection. Cultures were taken. The lungs appeared to look normal.

02/07/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

01/31/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white cell count is within normal limits, but the turtle has been placed on an anti-fungal medication as a precaution for a possible lung infection.

01/25/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

01/17/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

01/10/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

01/03/2018 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

12/27/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie is doing well in the larger tank and is using the flipper more each day.

12/20/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

12/13/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

12/07/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie has been moved to big blue.

11/29/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie is using the affected flipper more and more. The turtle will be moved into Big Blue this week to allow for more exercise.

11/22/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie is beginning to use the affected flipper.

11/15/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

11/08/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

11/01/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

10/25/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie continues to receive medication for osteomyelitis. A re-check radiograph is scheduled to be done in the near future.

10/19/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

10/04/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

09/27/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

09/19/2017 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rose did well during transportation to and from Atlanta. Rose ate well while at the aquarium. Upon arrival back to LMC, blood-work showed the turtle had an elevated white cell count, so the antibiotic treatment plan has been modified.

09/17/2017 – Our patients have returned home! We are so thankful for the Georgia Aquarium for taking in our patients during this storm.

09/07/2017 – All of our sea turtle patients have evacuated to the Georgia Aquarium due to Hurricane Irma. They will remain there with a member of our staff until it is safe to return. For all of our preparation for Hurricane Irma visit HERE.

08/31/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) We are planning to radiograph the injured flipper later this week.

08/23/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

08/16/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

08/10/17 Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

08/02/17 Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white cell count is still within normal limits. Rosie has not been using front flipper, but we are continuing to monitor the healing process.

07/27/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

07/20/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

07/12/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

07/05/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s white cell count is within normal limits, but the turtle is still not using the front flipper due to osteomyelitis.

06/28/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Radiographs of Rosie’s shoulder indicated that there is still an active infection in the joint, so treatment regimen has been changed.

06/21/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie is still not using the right front flipper even while on analgesics. Radiographs will be done the next time the turtle is pulled for routine exam.

06/15/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

06/08/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie was started on medication to alleviate pain associated with the osteomyelitis.

05/31/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

05/17/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Radiographs revealed osteomyelitis in the right shoulder joint. A treatment plan has been implemented.

05/11/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) The anemia is resolved and the iron supplements have been discontinued.

05/03/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie’s anemia is resolving and approaching normal limits. The white cell count has increased, so the treatment plan has been modified.

04/19/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

04/12/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green)

04/06/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) Rosie has been moved to a much larger tank to help stimulate the use of both front flippers.

03/30/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

03/22/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

03/15/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) 

03/08/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(green) The parenteral nutrition has caused the bone marrow to begin the production of red blood cells. Parenteral nutrition will be discontinued.

03/01/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) Rosie is undergoing hydrotherapy to stimulate use of the front flippers. This turtle is also receiving parenteral nutrition once daily to help resolve the anemia. The turtle is eating some food at the bottom of the tank without assistance.

02/22/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The turtle is diving more, resting on the bottom, and is now in deeper water.

02/16/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The turtle is able to submerge occasionally but is still floating a majority of the time.

02/08/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The veterinarian did a coelomic tap and removed just over 4 liters of air. The coelomic cavity did not immediately fill with air after the tap. This means the hole in the lung is starting to heal.

01/25/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The appetite has improved, and the turtle is now primarily on oral medications.

01/12/17 – Sea_turtle_icon(yellow) The turtle defecated a large quantity of crab shells and the remainder of the fishing line. New radiographs reveal free air in the coelomic cavity indicating an active hole in the lung. We will be removing air from the coelomic cavity once weekly. Usually the holes will close on their own with this treatment.

01/02/17 – Rosie is a large juvenile loggerhead that was found in the St. Lucie River by boaters. The turtle at some point ingested fishing line and is now passing it out through the cloaca. We will monitor the passing of the line closely. There is cotton ball attached to it in order for us to see its progression out of the digestive tract.  Radiographs show that the turtle does not have an ingested hook and that the intestines are impacted with food debris. There is also air in the intestines. We will monitor closely with bloodwork and follow-up radiographs as we treat with antibiotics and other medications.